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Cotswold town terrorized by two CHIHUAHUAS

Cotswold town terrorized by two CHIHUAHUAS: Council issues warning to pet owner of ‘Mexican hooligans’ after pair attacked retired police dog

  • Tiny terrors have been wreaking havoc in Corsham, Wiltshire, not on a leash
  • Councilor Ruth Hopkinson received a complaint after German Shepherd attack
  • She said: ‘The size of a dog is no reflection on their aggressiveness’

A Cotswold town is being terrorized by two chihuahuas that attacked a retired police dog and prompted the council to issue a warning to their owner.

The tiny terrors have been wreaking havoc in Corsham, Wiltshire, where they are allowed to run around without a lead.

Councilor Ruth Hopkinson received a complaint after the menaces attacked a German Shepherd, a former police dog.

The tiny terrors have been wreaking havoc in Corsham, Wiltshire, (pictured) where they are allowed to run around without a lead

Councilor Ruth Hopkinson received a complaint after the menaces attacked a German Shepherd, a former police dog.  Stock picture

Councilor Ruth Hopkinson received a complaint after the menaces attacked a German Shepherd, a former police dog. Stock pictures

One local told the publication he thinks of the pair as 'bloody Mexican hooligans'.  Stock picture of a German Shepherd

One local told the publication he thinks of the pair as ‘bloody Mexican hooligans’. Stock picture of a German Shepherd

She told locals on Facebook: ‘You might consider your dog ‘friendly’ but it may react in an unexpected way when faced with another dog or even a child.

‘In either case, please keep your dog under your control at all times, preferably leashed in public areas.

‘Any damage your dog does including vet bills for other dogs or dead lambs is your responsibility and you are liable.

Councilor Ruth Hopkinson (pictured) warned dog owners to keep their pets under control

Councilor Ruth Hopkinson (pictured) warned dog owners to keep their pets under control

‘Before anyone has a go at me: I love dogs (not so sure about cats) but owners need to be responsible, the vast majority of people are but there are some (probably the same ones who let their animal **** on the pavement) who aren’t.

‘I don’t want to turn us into a town of narks, but if you see something untoward on the estate report it to the estate office, in the street: the dog warden.’

She told The Sun: ‘The size of a dog is no reflection on their aggressiveness…

‘They weren’t leashed, and the owner thought, ”They’re only little, they’re only friendly”. But you have to be really careful.’

Chihuahuas are the world’s smallest breed of dog and they are known for an aggression which stems from being protective over their territory and owners.

One local told the publication he thinks of the pair as ‘bloody Mexican hooligans’.

Chihuahuas are named after the Mexican state where they became fashionable in the late 19th century.

Chihuahua: smallest breed of dog

Chihuahuas are the smallest recognized breed of dog and were named after the Mexican state of the same name where it was first recorded in the mid-19th century.

It is believed that chihuahuas were created from the Techichi – a small, quiet dog owned by the Toltec people of Mexico as long ago as the 9th century.

It is an alert dog which stands at just five inches tall and wights between one and six pounds.

Chihuahuas classic characteristics are a rounded head, large erect ears and prominent eyes.

Smaller dogs are sometimes bred improperly by using the ‘runts’ of litters to make the smallest animal possible.

This can lead to inherited birth defects which could cause the dog to be aggressive because of underlying medical conditions.

Chihuahuas are also known to be very territorial and protective of their owners so could become aggressive if they feel threatened.

They were bred to hunt small rodents and insects in Mexico, which could mean their genetics have a part to play in any aggression.

The People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) explain: ‘Chihuahuas, like any dog, are likely to make some noise and this will be down to the individual, their personality and training.

‘The good news is that as they are clever dogs, they can be taught not to bark excessively but this needs to start from a young age, ideally before they develop the habit. If you’re having trouble with problem barking, we’d recommend seeking the advice of an accredited behaviourist.’

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